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Shaw now charged with conspiracy to distribute drugs

Andy Shaw, 31 (Courtesy: Bremer County Jail)
Andy Shaw, 31 (Courtesy: Bremer County Jail)(KCRG)
Published: Oct. 7, 2019 at 5:29 PM CDT
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A man who was allegedly connected to the circumstances surrounding the death of Chris Bagley is facing an additional drug-related charge after pleading guilty to one in federal court earlier this year, according to court filings.

Andy Shaw, 31, is now charged with conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance, in this case, 100 kilograms or more of a mixture or substance containing a detectable amount of marijuana. Court filings said the activities leading to this charge took place between sometime in 2010 and around March 26, 2019.

According to testimony on April 1, 2019, in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Iowa by Marion Police officer Adam Cirkl, who is also on the Drug Enforcement Administration's task force for the Cedar Rapids area, a separate investigation in Johnson County led officials to Shaw after the subject there allegedly identified Shaw as his marijuana supplier.

Cirkl said that a source working with law enforcement purchased three pounds of marijuana from Shaw on October 2017 at his business in Cedar Rapids. He also alleged that Shaw conspired with others to receive packages from California via FedEx that contained both THC vaping cartridges and raw marijuana in them.

Searches of a residence and a business law enforcement said was owned by Shaw allegedly turned up cash, guns, drying racks, gummy molds that potentially were used to manufacture THC-infused gummy bears, cellphones, and empty THC cartridges, according to testimony by Cirkl.

Defense attorneys for Shaw pushed back on Cirkl's testimony, questioning him on whether Shaw had access to one of the properties where the drug-related items were seized.

Cirkl also testified that the number of cars and luxury watches, the latter allegedly totaling a value around $43,000 that the DEA seized while investigating Shaw would not have been consistent with a person operating Shaw's business, A. Shaw Investments. Cirkl said that Shaw told him he made around $60,000 per year from that business, which flipped houses.

In cross-examination, Cirkl did not have knowledge of whether Shaw had outstanding debt beyond what Shaw had told him about, including a mortgage and a truck payment. Cirkl acknowledged the watches could have been purchased using a credit card.

In early September, Shaw pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court to possessing a rifle and a shotgun while using drugs. He faces up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine from that plea agreement.