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Flooding seems certain for some along the Missouri River

FILE- In this Oct. 22, 2019 photo, a barn sits in floodwaters in Pacific Junction, Iowa. Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas and Missouri are joining forces for a study that will look for ways the states can limit flooding along the Missouri River and give them information about how wetter weather patterns could require changes to the federal government's management of the basin's reservoirs. The states are pooling their money to pay for half of a $400,000 study with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to measure how much water flows down the Missouri River. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
FILE- In this Oct. 22, 2019 photo, a barn sits in floodwaters in Pacific Junction, Iowa. Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas and Missouri are joining forces for a study that will look for ways the states can limit flooding along the Missouri River and give them information about how wetter weather patterns could require changes to the federal government's management of the basin's reservoirs. The states are pooling their money to pay for half of a $400,000 study with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to measure how much water flows down the Missouri River. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)(KCRG)
Published: Feb. 13, 2020 at 3:27 PM CST
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The National Weather Service says there's an elevated flood risk along the eastern Missouri River basin this spring. That's because the soil remains wet and significant snow is on the ground in North Dakota and South Dakota.

Communities along the lower Missouri River already were bracing for the prospect of more flooding this spring because many of their levees remain in poor shape after last year’s massive flooding.

Nearly everywhere that flooded last year in Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas and Missouri is at some risk to flood again because of the extensive damage to levees.

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