As more women run for office, child care remains a hurdle

In this March 2017, photo, provided by Rep. Kimberly Dudik, Dudik speaks on the floor of the legislature holding her newborn son Marcutio in Helena, Mont. As experts predict another banner year of women running for office, hurdles remain particularly for those like Dudik who have young children. Only six states have laws specifically allowing the use of campaign funds for child care. In most states, including Montana, the law is silent on the issue and up to interpretation by state agencies or boards. (Rep. Nate McConnell/Rep. Kimberly Dudik via AP)
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SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - Women are expected to run for office in high numbers in 2020, but many of them face financial hurdles paying for child care while they campaign.

Candidates for federal office can tap their campaign accounts to pay for it, but it's a patchwork at the state level. Just six states have laws specifically allowing the use of campaign money for child care.

In most states, the law is silent on the issue and up to interpretation.

Female candidates say the expense is an unnecessary barrier and shows why more women are needed in positions of power.