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Government job losses are piling up, and it could get worse

FILE - In this March 15, 2018, file photo, a dispatcher works at a desk station with a variety of screens used by those who take 911 emergency calls. Jobs with state and city governments are usually a source of stability in the U.S. economy, but the financial devastation wrought by the coronavirus pandemic has forced cuts that will reduce public services, from schools to trash pickup. In some areas, 911 calls are taking a longer time to be answered.
FILE - In this March 15, 2018, file photo, a dispatcher works at a desk station with a variety of screens used by those who take 911 emergency calls. Jobs with state and city governments are usually a source of stability in the U.S. economy, but the financial devastation wrought by the coronavirus pandemic has forced cuts that will reduce public services, from schools to trash pickup. In some areas, 911 calls are taking a longer time to be answered.(Lisa Marie Pane | AP Photo/Lisa Marie Pane, File)
Published: Jun. 6, 2020 at 11:32 AM CDT|Updated: Jun. 6, 2020 at 11:31 AM CDT
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Federal, state and local governments have shed over 1.5 million jobs since March as they begin to deal with the financial fallout from the coronavirus pandemic.

It could get worse in a sector that’s usually a stable part of the U.S. economy. Governments are trying to balance their budgets for a fiscal year that starts July 1 but expect tax revenue to be down by 20% or more in many places.

That means temporary cuts to get through the next month could become permanent and affect everything from schools to trash pickup.

There’s a push on for $1 trillion in additional aid from Congress.

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