'Biggest Loser' Competitor Sells Huge Burger

In this photo taken Jan. 26, 20, The "Rulon Buger," a 1.5 lbs. of meat patty on a bun that is custom-baked and served with a family sized order of fries and a 44 oz. drink is displayed at Rulon's Burger Barn in Afton, Wyo. Rulon's Burger Barn owner Russell Gardner, Rulon's brother, says the monster meal is most often ordered by families and shared. Rulon Gardner is competing to lose weight on the NBC show, "The Biggest Loser." He weighed in at 474 pounds (215 kilograms), more than 200 pounds (90 kilograms) heavier than when he won gold. (AP Photo/Casper Star-Tribune, Dan Cepeda)

Tools

By Kelli Sutterman

AFTON, Wyoming (AP) — An Olympic champion wrestler has been serving a 1.5-pound (0.68-kilogram) hamburger at his restaurant, even while competing to be "The Biggest Loser" on TV.

The mighty Rulon Burger at Rulon Gardner's Burger Barn restaurant is so big it's molded in a pizza tin. It comes on a bun with all the toppings.

Gardner won gold at the 2000 Olympics by beating Alexander Karelin, a Russian who hadn't lost in 13 years. Gardner's challenge to all comers now: Finish the burger plus a basket of fries and a 44-ounce (1,250-gram) drink in 20 minutes.

Winners get a signed Rulon Gardner Olympic Champion T-shirt and their name on Rulon's Wall of Fame. Gardner's best time is 8 minutes, 23 seconds, set when he opened the restaurant in his hometown in 2004.

This year, Gardner has been competing to lose weight on the NBC show, "The Biggest Loser." He weighed in at the beginning at 474 pounds (215 kilograms), more than 200 pounds (90 kilograms) heavier than when he won gold.

His reality show teammate, Justin Pope, runs a gym with Gardner in Logan, Utah. Viewers have included Jeff Hunsaker of Utah, who made the Wall of Fame a couple years ago by eating a Rulon Burger in 19 minutes, 1 second.

Hunsaker said he's been trying to lose 30 pounds (13.6 kilograms) himself.

"I'm now watching the show because of him and being inspired, frankly," he said.

Gardner has stayed in the news since 2000, and not just by wrestling.

He was stranded in a snowmobile outing in 2002 and lost a toe to frostbite. A car hit him on his motorcycle in 2004. Three years after that, he was forced to swim in 44-degrees Fahrenheit (6.6-Celsius) water when his plane crashed in Utah.

Conversation Guidelines

Be Kind

Don't use abusive, offensive, threatening, racist, vulgar or sexually-oriented language.
Don't attack someone personally. Keep it civil and be responsible.

Share Knowledge

Be truthful. Share what you know and what you are passionate about.
What more do you want to learn? Keep it simple.

Stay focused

Promote lively and healthy debate. Stay on topic. Ask questions and give feedback on the story's topic.

Report Trouble

Help us maintain a quality comment section by reporting comments that are offensive. If you see a comment that is offensive, or you feel violates our guidelines, simply click on the "x" to the far right of the comment to report it.


read the full guidelines here »

Commenting will be disabled on stories dealing with the following subject matter: Crime, sexual abuse, property fires, automobile accidents, Amber Alerts, Operation Quickfinds and suicides.

facebook twitter rss mobile google plus
email alerts you tube hooplanow pinterest instagram

What's On KCRG