Police Release More Details On Cedar Rapids Murder-Suicide

By Rick Smith and Chris Earl, Reporters

CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa - Estranged husband Robert Livingston entered his mother-in-law's house here last Thursday morning and immediately began firing an AR-15 military-looking rifle, killing both his wife and mother-in-law with multiple shots, Police Chief Wayne Jerman said Wednesday.

Livingston, 47, then shot himself once with a second gun, .380-caliber handgun, the chief said. Police found all three in the kitchen area.

Officers were summoned to the home of Livingston's 73-year-old mother-in-law, Linda Huber, 3515 Banar Dr. SW, at 6:39 a.m. last Thursday, Jan. 30. The Livingstons' two school-aged daughters were in the house at the time of the shooting, and the oldest daughter called police, Chief Jerman said.

On Tuesday, John Huber, Ingrid Livingston's brother and guardian of the surviving children, sought and secured an injunction in Linn County District Court, which prohibits the Police Department from releasing the contents of 911 calls made to police related to the double murder-suicide.

Chief Jerman said Robert Livingston left no note about his intentions and apparently made no verbal declarations as he killed his wife, 41, and mother-in-law and then himself.

His wife and daughters recently had moved out of the family residence at 3600 Big Horn Dr. SW to Linda Huber's residence about three blocks away.

Jerman said Robert Livingston drove to the shooting scene in his sport utility vehicle.

Robert Livingston secured a permit to carry weapons in January 2013, according to the Linn County Sheriff's Office.

Ingrid Livingston worked as director of marketing at Highway Equipment Co. in Cedar Rapids. Robert Livingston had identified himself as an alarm technician in documents that police reviewed since his death.

On the Tuesday evening of Jan. 28 before last Thursday's double murder-suicide, Robert Livingston summoned police officers to his residence for help, asking to be taken to Mercy Medical Center for some sort of emotional crisis, not a physical problem, and said that he had guns at his home, the police chief said.

He said two officers arrived at Livingston's house at 8:47 p.m. and found him alone. One officer took Livingston to the hospital at 8:50 p.m., they arrived at 9:03 p.m. and the officer departed at 9:07 p.m., leaving Livingston with hospital personnel.

Mercy Medical Center on Wednesday did not comment, citing "patient privacy considerations."

On that Jan. 28 call, Chief Jerman said at least one officer had asked Livingston about the guns. Livingston informed him that the guns were locked in a safe and both had trigger locks, the chief said.

In some instances, police officers ask to confiscate guns. But the officer at the scene in this case did not see any evidence that Livingston intended to harm himself or anyone else, the chief said.
Jerman said the request to be taken to the hospital centered on stress caused by a troubled relationship.

The chief did not know how long Livingston stayed at the hospital after being taken there Tuesday evening. Jerman said he only knows that Livingston was back home by dawn on Thursday when Livingston went to his mother-in-law's residence and committed the shootings.

The Police Department's report logs show that police officers made a welfare check at the Livingstons' home at 8:55 p.m. on Dec. 9. The call was handled without a report.

The officer who took Livingston to Mercy Medical Center two evenings before the double murder-suicide did not make a note in his report about having knowledge about the Dec. 9 check at the Livingstons' home.
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