New Details on Boston Marathon Bombings, Victims

BOSTON (AP) - An intelligence bulletin issued to law enforcement and released late Tuesday includes a picture of a mangled pressure cooker and a torn black bag the FBI said were part of a bomb used Monday at the Boston Marathon.

The FBI and other law enforcement agencies have repeatedly pleaded for members of the public to come forward with photos, videos or anything suspicious they might have seen or heard.

Federal authorities say the person or persons responsible for the attack likely used ordinary pressure cookers packed with shrapnel such as nails, metal shards or ball bearings. Both devices were left on the ground in bags or backpacks made of nylon.

Officials say information on how to make such bombs is readily found online.

Meantime, hundreds of people have gathered for a vigil on the Boston Common one day after the bombing attack on the city's marathon.

Several hundred people turned out Tuesday evening with banners declaring "Peace here and everywhere" and "Boston, you're our home."

Participants sang songs including "Amazing Grace" and "The Star-Spangled Banner." They also lit candles.

Three people were killed and more than 170 people were injured in the bombings near the end of the race on Monday.

Boston University says a graduate student at the school was one of the three people killed in the bombings at the Boston Marathon.

In a statement late Tuesday afternoon, the school said it was not releasing the name or any other information about the student, pending permission from the family.

The statement says the student was with two friends who were watching the race at the finish line, not far from the university's campus. One of the friends, also a grad student at the university, was injured and is at Boston Medical Center in stable condition.

The two other victims who died have been identified as 8-year-old Martin Richard, of Boston, and 29-year-old Krystle Campbell, of Medford.

More than 170 people were injured.

The Boston Marathon says the race will go on in 2014.

The executive director of the Boston Athletic Association calls the race a "deeply held tradition - an integral part of the fabric and history of our community."

Thomas Grilk says in a statement Tuesday that organizers are "committed to continuing that tradition" with the 118th Boston Marathon in 2014.

Grilk adds that his group is cooperating with law enforcement in the investigation of the bombings. Three people were killed and more than 170 were injured near the marathon finish line Monday.
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