Hy-Vee at Midday: Enjoy Eggs

By Linda Ashley, Hy-Vee Dietitian

KCRG-TV9 Midday News Nutrition Expert
Presented by your Oakland Rd. Hy-Vee Dietitian
April 3, 2012
Linda Ashley, RD, LD Hy-Vee Dietitian
Oakland Road Hy-Vee
3235 Oakland Rd NE
Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52402
319-366-7756 e-mail: Lashley@hy-vee.com

Good Eggs
Crack open an egg! Inside each egg you'll find 13 different vitamins and minerals along with 6 grams of protein packed into just 70 calories. The protein is found in the egg white and the remainder of the nutrients are concentrated in the egg yolk. Today's eggs are 14% lower in cholesterol than eggs produced 10 years ago. Eggs are also one of the few food sources of vitamin D with each egg providing 40IU of vitamin D or 10% of your daily requirement.
Eggs are also a symbol of springtime and fun for kids of all ages! Let your kids experiment with natural food dyes made from ingredients you may have around your kitchen. Be sure to dye some extra eggs this year so you'll have plenty for the Light & Fluffy Deviled Eggs recipe that follows.

Perfect Hard-Cooked Eggs
All you need:
1 dozen eggs

All you do:
1. Place eggs in a single layer in a saucepan.
2. Add enough water to cover at least 1 inch above the eggs.
3. Cover pan and bring to a boil quickly.
4. Turn off the heat and remove the pan from the burner.
5. Let the eggs stand, covered, in the hot water for 15 minutes.
6. To help prevent a dark surface on the yolks, remove the eggs from the water after 15 minutes and immediately run cold water over the eggs, or place them in ice water until completely cooled.
7. Peel eggs right after cooling for immediate use, or refrigerate them in the shell in the egg carton for use within 1 week.
Source: www.Hy-Vee.com

Natural Egg Dyes
You can create your own natural dyes for coloring eggs by using common foods such as fruits, vegetables, spices, tea or coffee. Dyeing eggs with natural dyes is a longer process and may require eggs to soak in color for several hours to develop darker colors. Although a longer wait, the fun is watching colorful eggs develop from dyes you have created from foods found right in your kitchen.

Steps to use natural ready-to-dye colors are: pour dye mixture into bowl or jar that will allow dye to completely cover egg, add 1 to 2 teaspoons white vinegar, add boiled egg that has been cooled, let eggs remain in dye in refrigerator until desired color. Deeper colors will require eggs to soak in dye longer.

Dry dyed eggs in an empty egg carton in the refrigerator. Natural dyed eggs will not be glossy. Once eggs have dried, give eggs a shiny sheen by rubbing a small amount of vegetable oil on egg.

Refer to chart below for ready-to-dye colors or use your imagination to create your own colorful natural dyes:

Purple - Grape juice or red wine
Blue – Blueberry juice (try the liquid from Hy-Vee frozen blueberries)
Pink - Canned beet juice or raspberry juice (try the liquid from Hy-Vee frozen raspberries)
Red - Canned cherries or dark red fruit juice such as pomegranate
Green – Canned spinach liquid or cooking water from boiling spinach leaves
Brown - Strong coffee
Yellow - Strong green tea

Light & Fluffy Deviled Eggs
Deviled eggs are an Easter staple. This recipe replaces some of the mayonnaise with 1% lowfat cottage cheese keeping the filling velvety and rich while reducing some of the fat; no one will know the difference!

All you need:
12 large hard-boiled eggs, peeled
1/3 cup nonfat cottage cheese
1/4 cup low-fat mayonnaise
3 tablespoons minced fresh chives, or scallion greens
1 tablespoon sweet pickle relish or fresh tarragon leaves
2 teaspoons yellow mustard
1/8 teaspoon salt
Paprika, for garnish

All you do:
Halve eggs lengthwise with a sharp knife. Gently remove the yolks and place in a food processor. Add cottage cheese, mayonnaise, chives (or scallion greens), relish, mustard and salt; process until smooth. Spoon about 2 teaspoons yolk mixture into each egg white half. Sprinkle with paprika, if desired.

Get creative with deviled egg garnishes and try whatever you like, such as dill, freshly cracked black pepper or diced avocado.

Serves six. Nutrition information per serving (2 halves = 1 serving): 70 calories; 4 g fat ( 2 g sat , 2 g mono ); 140 mg cholesterol; 2 g carbohydrates; 0 g added sugars; 7 g protein; 0 g fiber; 85 mg sodium
Source: Eating Well magazine, modified by Linda Ashley, RD, LD Oakland Rd. Hy-Vee
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