Sept. 12th vote decides fate of Gladbrook-Reinbeck School District

By  | 

GLADBROOK- Iowa (KCRG TV9)-- In a couple of weeks, voters in several districts will go to the polls. For one district it's a decision on whether it will exist anymore.

Voters in the Gladbrook-Reinbeck will decide its fate on September 12th.

A group of parents got enough signatures on a petition to vote to dissolve the district. If passed, kids will go to several other existing districts.

Take a drive through Reinbeck, and you'll see "Vote No" signs on each corner.

The parents of students here are organizing efforts to stop the school district from dissolving.

"My daughter who's in first, she's a very shy little girl, and kindergarten was rough on her. And now, come first grade she's more open she doesn't cry when she comes to school,” Michelle Keller said.

Keller has two kids in the district. She says the small town atmosphere has allowed her children to thrive.

"I think having the people we do in the elementary school that has helped her a lot,” she said.

It's a setting that could soon change.

“That’s a very good chance if the territory of Glabrook-Reinbeck got divided up to neighboring districts. The neighboring districts might not need any of our buildings open,” Superintendent David Hill said.

The whole issue started when the school board decided to close this school in Gladbrook about three years ago. After that decision, many parents in Gladbrook chose to open enroll their students outside of this district. And because of that many parents don't want their property taxes going to the district anymore.

Mike Bearden is spear-heading the movement to dissolve this district. He doesn't have kids that go to the district anymore, but says he's following the views of other parents in the district.

"It's a win -win for everyone. The Glabrook people will go to Green Mountain-Garwin, the Reinbeck people will mostly go to Dike- they're a strong district,” Bearden said.

But many parents, especially in Reinbeck, disagree.

"The kids are going to be the ones that have to make the change, not adults,” Keller said.